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Section 2. TRACK REQUIREMENTS

10-2-1. DESCRIPTION

a. Aerial refueling tracks are established to accommodate refueling operations along a prescribed route.  An aerial refueling track consists of an ARIP, ARCP, and an exit point.  Navigation check points between the ARCP and exit point are specified, as required, to facilitate navigation along the route.  It also includes the tanker orbit pattern at the ARCP, and the altitude block(s) assigned for the track.

b. Instructions for preparing and submitting track proposals are contained in
Section 4 of this chapter.

10-2-2. NAVIGATION ALONG AIR REFUELING TRACK

Navigation along an aerial refueling track shall be accomplished using a combination of airborne equipment and NAVAID's as appropriate.

NOTE-
Whatever the method of navigation, participating aircraft shall be expected to adhere to the course centerline during aerial refueling operations unless deviations within/beyond the track are specifically approved by the ARTCC/CERAP, or are authorized in a procedural letter of agreement with the controlling agency.

10-2-3. ARIP ESTABLISHMENTS

The ARIP shall be established:

a. At a distance from the ARCP which shall meet the requirements of the primary user command.

b. Within 30 degrees either side of the extended centerline of the track on which the actual air refueling operation is to be accomplished.

c. Within the same ARTCC/CERAP area as the ARCP whenever practical.

d. So as to provide for a direct course between the ARIP and ARCP.

10-2-4. DEGREE-DISTANCE TRACK DEFINITION

a. Tracks predicated on degree-distance track definition shall provide:

1. A means of navigation from the ARIP to the exit point via a usable NAVAID radial/distance or along offshore extended routes.

2. A means of navigation from at least one navigational checkpoint or from the exit point to proceed IFR en route via a usable NAVAID.

b. Tracks located over water or in remote areas or beyond the range of fixed NAVAID's shall be predicated on geographical coordinate route definition with suitable navigation means provided by the user command.

10-2-5. TANKER ORBIT PATTERNS

The following describes typical orbit patterns for jet aircraft and turboprop/conventional type aircraft.

a. Turbojet - Normally, a rectangle 60 NM long (48 NM uptrack and 12 NM downtrack from ARCP or anchor point) and 25 NM wide, oriented longitudinally along the ARIP-ARCP or anchor point segment of the track so as to provide 7 NM of airspace on the nonholding side of the refueling track and 18 NM of airspace on the holding side.   This pattern shall normally be designed for left turns.  When right turns are used, the orientation of the orbit pattern will shift accordingly.  (See
FIG 10-2-1, Components of a Typical Turbojet Aerial Refueling Track.)

b. Conventional/Turboprop - Normally, a rectangle 34 NM long (27 NM uptrack and 7 NM downtrack from ARCP or anchor point) and 18 NM wide, oriented longitudinally along the ARIP-ARCP or anchor point segment of the track so as to provide 4.5 NM of airspace on the nonholding side of the refueling track and
13.5 NM of airspace on the holding side.  The pattern shall normally be designed for left turns.  When right turns are used, the orientation of the orbit pattern will shift accordingly.  (See FIG 10-2-2, Components of a Typical Conventional/Turboprop Aerial Refueling Track.)

                                                                                                                               FIG 10-2-1

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FIG 10-2-2

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